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Save on auto insurance in CBS.

We're one of Conception Bay South's largest independent brokers. We specialize in auto insurance. With a simple online quote or a quick call, you will get quotes from up to eight insurance companies. And with savings of up to 30%, you'll be on the road with CBS’s best auto protection and benefits. That's a promise.
Save on auto insurance in Conception Bay South.
We're one of Conception Bay South's largest independent brokers. We specialize in auto insurance. With a simple online quote or a quick call, you will get quotes from up to eight insurance companies. And with savings of up to 30%, you'll be on the road with CBS’s best auto protection and benefits. That's a promise.
Conception Bay South, a region of growth and a bright future.
woods hike Conception Bay South Car Insurance
woods hike Conception Bay South Auto Insurance

As one of the province’s newest towns in close proximity to the capital of Newfoundland, St. John’s and its international airport, it is also made up of some of Newfoundland’s oldest settlements. Conception Bay South is thriving with a growing business community and has become one of the most attractive places to live in the province. The excellent highway structure has been created with the growth of the Town in mind, and the best interest of residents to reach major health care facilities and St. John’s amenities in mind. Your insurance can be as unique as your route. At Munn Insurance you can find the most competitive auto insurance in CBS and save while you’re doing it.

Driving in Conception Bay South – Tips to keep you on the road.

Serious about road safety.

With a current population of 26,000 residents and seeing steady growth, Conception Bay South has made it a priority to ensure neighbourhood safety for pedestrians, cyclists and drivers. With continued investment in traffic calming and education, the Town has regular radar patrol in areas know for higher driving speeds, mobile digital traffic signs, targeted traffic operations in partnership with the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary and a sidewalk program with a priority in school zone areas.

Keeping ahead of the snow.

Winters in Newfoundland can be particularly daunting, so Conception Bay South has approximately 35 full-time and part-time staff to support the engagement of 18 pieces of snow-clearing equipment within a 24-hour period. During winter, the Town has three shifts out scheduled 24 hours a day, five days a week, with weekend on-call as needed. Even with the full fleet in operation it takes approximately eight hours to clear the entire town.

Find your speed.

With the Town continuing to grow, it has prioritized safety initiatives and traffic calming measures throughout. They continuously update a map embedded on the Conception Bay South website that collects speed data for various streets so residents can see what the average driving speed is in their neighbourhood.

Keep those plates clean.

Anyone in control of a vehicle must make sure that identification plates are securely fastened at all times to the vehicle, no matter if the driver is the owner or not. It’s also important that the license plates are kept clean from dirt and that the numbers and registration stickers are visible at all times. This is especially important during the winter and spring seasons, when snow and dirt can accumulate and obstruct the view of the plate.

topsail beach auto car insurance
Kids Walk Conception Bay South Auto Insurance
A few facts about auto insurance in CBS.
  • The average age of auto insurance policyholder in Conception Bay South is 30
  • The average age of drivers in Conception Bay South is 41
  • The number of accident claims in Conception Bay South in 2018 was 1500
  • The top automotive brands we insure in Conception Bay South are Toyota, Chevrolet, Ford, Honda, Mazda, Dodge, Volkswagen
  • 63% of people in Conception Bay South drive Cars
  • 37% of people in Conception Bay South drive Trucks
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Facts and myths about Conception Bay South.

Facts

Conception Bay South was incorporated in 1973.

The Town consists of nine communities: Topsail, Chamberlains, Manuels, Long Pond, Foxtrap, Kelligrews, Upper Gullies, Lawrence Pond and Seal Cove.

The Town lies on a zone of Cambrian bedrock, primarily shale containing limestone concretions and manganese ores.

The majority of households have an income that is above the national average of $90,000.

Myths

Conception Bay South is a small coastal region reliant on St. John’s.

CBS is actually comprised of nine communities, with its own municipal services such as automated garbage pickup and snow clearing. The Town has a thriving business community and a growing population.

Conception Bay South weather is the same or worse than the rest of Newfoundland.

The Town’s weather is some of the best in the province, with early settlers attracted to the region by good growing land, abundant supplies of firewood and the more temperate climate as compared to other parts of the Avalon Peninsula.

There are no tourism attractions within Conception Bay South.

CBS is a town with nine unique communities that all boast attractions for tourists and residents alike. You can find the T’Railway, a non-motorized trail that traces the old Newfoundland Railway railbed. It’s also home to Topsail Beach that features an extensive picnic area, playground, gazebo and an amphitheatre. Many visitors partake in campfires and swimming. Visitors can also enjoy the Manuels River, an internationally recognized site known for 500-million-year-old trilobite fossils found along the riverbanks and visit the Manuels River Hibernia Interpretation Centre.

For most shopping and services, residents must travel to St. John’s.

The Town has a growing a business community, with businesses in every category. CBS is home to everything from art galleries and recording studios to accounting firms and marketing agencies.

We do the shopping. You get the savings.
We do the shopping. You get the savings.
Newfoundlanders love choice. And they love saving too! At Munn Insurance, we deliver on both. As an independent insurance broker, we shop our extensive network of insurance partners to provide our Newfoundland customers with the best coverage at the best rate. Some of the insurance companies we search for our customers include:
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How Munn Insurance saves you money.

We work for you – that’s what an insurance broker does. We shop the market on your behalf, so Munn insurance can offer you the most access to the best discounts from our insurance partners.

  • Bundling (Auto + Home Discount)
  • Multiple Vehicle Discounts
  • Experienced Drivers Discount
  • Safe Drivers Discount
  • Claims-Free Discount
  • Loyalty Discount
  • And Many More
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Combine your home and auto policies and save.

With Munn Insurance, home and auto policies are better together. It means extra savings and additional coverage.  So combine them both and receive a discount on both. That’s like a double discount!

Combining also gives you the extra convenience of aligned renewal rates and less paperwork.

You can combine your auto policy with any Munn Insurance home policy for the following dwelling types:

  • Private Homes
  • Condos
  • Tenants
  • Cabins/Cottages
  • Rented Dwellings
Newfoundland Nova Scotia Insurance

Special discounts and savings with a Munn Insurance group policy.

We recognize the value groups provide to Newfoundland communities. First Responders, Health Care Professionals, Alumni Associations, Educators and Instructors all play a vital role in helping others across the Island. They give so much, and we’re happy to give back. Munn Insurance Preferred Groups in Newfoundland are able to take advantage of special discounts and many extra-valuable benefits.

  • Special Group Discounts
  • Mortgage & Real Estate Assistance
  • 0% Insurance Financing
  • Home Repair Assistance
  • Legal Assistance
  • Health Assistance
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Munn Insurance Group Insurance for CAA Members
Mom window of car CAA Members can SAVE up to 20% on Auto and Home Insurance
CAA Members Save up to 20% at Munn Insurance
CAA Members Save up to 20% at Munn Insurance
  • CAA Members can SAVE up to 20% on Auto and Home Insurance
  • Access to multiple insurance markets; knowing you get the best coverage at the best rate
  • Confidence and security of being a member of a preferred group
  • Local, fast and efficient 24/7 Claims Service
  • Legal Assistance
  • Health Assistance
Get Newfoundland’s best leisure vehicle protection.

Newfoundlanders love their leisure time and their leisure vehicles. MyRide Leisure Insurance from Munn Insurance is the most competitive, comprehensive leisure vehicle insurance available in Newfoundland. Whether it’s your ATV, motorhome, motorcycle – or any of your leisure vehicles – A Munn policy offers more protection and value than any other program you’ll find.

  • Boat and Watercraft
  • ATV
  • Snowmobile
  • Classic Cars and Auto
  • Motorhome, RV and Trailer
  • Motorcycle
Munn Insurance MyRide Leisure Classic Car
ATV Munn Insurance MyRide Leisure
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Car insurance laws in Conception Bay South.

Conception Bay South drivers must be in possession of legally determined minimum insurance coverage to drive on our roads. These minimum limits have been enacted to ensure drivers are financially responsible if an at-fault accident occurs.

Current limits for auto insurance in Conception Bay South are:

  • $200,000 in liability coverage per accident
  • Uninsured and unidentified motorist coverage

Conception Bay South drivers are not required to carry accident benefits coverage, although most do choose to buy this coverage, which includes coverage for medical payments, disability coverage, and death benefits coverage. This type of insurance is mandatory in other provinces. Many drivers in Newfoundland also opt to increase their liability coverage to limit risk and financial exposure.

There are also other optional coverages that can be purchased. These include comprehensive and collision coverage to protect in the event of an at-fault accident or non-accident scenario such as theft.

St. John's Newfoundland NL Courthouse
St. John's Newfoundland NL Courthouse
Conception Bay South car insurance – your questions answered.
Car Seat Coverage
  • In Newfoundland and Labrador, who determines auto insurance rates?

    In Newfoundland and Labrador, individual insurers set auto insurance rates, which are then regulated and approved by the Newfoundland and Labrador Board of Commissioners of Public Utilities. Among the top factors that go into determining your rate are your driving record including tickets or at-fault accidents, the value of the car you drive as well as the make and model, and your driving habits including the length of your daily commute.

  • What are the factors used to determine auto insurance rates in Newfoundland and Labrador?

    Auto insurance rates in Newfoundland and Labrador are determined by a variety of factors:

    • Your driving record
    • The type and age of your car
    • Your insurance claims record
    • Your annual mileage and territory of use
    • How you use your car (personal or business)
    • Whether or not any other drivers in the household use your car

    The 2004 auto insurance reform prevents auto insurance companies from denying coverage or increasing rates solely on the basis of any of these factors:

    • Age and gender
    • Age of the vehicle
    • Accidents in which you were not at fault
    • Lapses in insurance except when tied to a license suspension for a violation of traffic laws
    • Previously being refused insurance by another company
    • Being insured with Facility Association
  • How do auto insurance rates in Newfoundland and Labrador compare to other provinces?

    Newfoundland and Labrador auto insurance premiums fall in the lower half of the national rate spectrum.

    • Ontario $1445
    • British Columbia $1680
    • Alberta $1251
    • Manitoba $1080
    • North West Territories $978
    • Nunavut $963
    • Nova Scotia $847
    • Saskatchewan $936
    • New Brunswick $819
    • Prince Edward Island $796
    • Quebec $661

    Source: Insurance Bureau of Canada, 2017 and 2016 for Quebec

  • Newfoundland and Labrador’s auto insurance rates are low. Why?

    Auto insurance rates in Newfoundland and Labrador are on the lower side of the spectrum thanks, in large part, to the reforms enacted by the government in 2004. These auto insurance reforms helped reduce rates across the province. But according to the Insurance Bureau of Canada, additional reforms are necessary to maintain rate stability. Problems that allow for large pain and suffering awards for relatively minor injuries continue to exist in the province’s auto insurance system.

  • What can I do to find cheap auto insurance in Conception Bay South?

    There are many ways to get cheap auto insurance in Conception Bay South:

    • Work with an independent broker who can help you find the best policy
    • Always pay your premiums on time
    • Choose a vehicle with less susceptibility to theft
    • Choose a vehicle with more safety and security features
    • Maintain a good driving history
    • Obey the rules of the road and avoid speeding tickets
    • Understand and choose the right type of insurance coverage
    • Shop around for the best policy
  • Is auto insurance mandatory in Newfoundland and Labrador?

    Yes. The law requires motorists to carry insurance on their vehicle.

  • In Newfoundland and Labrador, what are the penalties for driving without auto insurance in Conception Bay South?

    If you’re convicted of driving without insurance in Newfoundland and Labrador, you’ll have to pay a fine that ranges from $2,000 to $4,000 for your first offence. The fine increases to a range of $3,000 to $5,000 for second and subsequent offences. And there are other penalties that may accompany your fine. If you’re charged for driving without insurance in Newfoundland and Labrador, you may also have your driver’s license suspended and your vehicle impounded for 90 days.

  • What insurance system does Newfoundland and Labrador adhere to?

    Newfoundland and Labrador operates under the tort system. This lets you sue an at-fault driver for your pain and suffering, wage losses, and other damages related to an accident.

  • How is fault determined by insurance companies in Newfoundland and Labrador?

    In Newfoundland, the adjusters for the insurance companies involved in the claim will determine who is at fault. Each insurance company uses its own guidelines to come up with a fault determination.

    Newfoundland is unusual in Canada in that it has no type of no-fault benefits. The insurance company for the at-fault driver is responsible for paying out on damages to the other driver’s vehicle as well as for injuries. Accident benefits are not a mandatory coverage in Newfoundland but are available to drivers who choose to add them to their insurance policy.

    The handling of claims is governed by insurance regulations; the 2004 reforms helped to reduce the cost of lawsuits, but drivers can still be sued for pain and suffering.

As one of Atlantic Canada’s largest independent brokers, we work for you – not the insurance company. So we always have your best interests at heart. That’s why we will shop around to find you the best insurance at the best price.
Our Latest Advice

How to Prepare for a Wildfire

Munn Insurance How to Prepare for a Wildfire

Many homeowners face the risk of wildfires, which are usually triggered by lightning or accidents. They spread quickly, igniting brush, trees and homes. Reduce your risk of damage by preparing now to protect your family, home and property.

Preparing Your Home for a Wildfire

The following are things you can do to protect yourself, your family and your property in the event of a fire.

  • Design and landscape your home with wildfire safety in mind. Select materials and plants that can help contain fire rather than fuel it.
    • Use fire-resistant or non-combustible materials on the roof and exterior structure of your house, or treat wood or combustible material used in roofs, siding, decking or trim with fire-retardant chemicals.
    • Plant fire-resistant shrubs and trees. For example, hardwood trees are less flammable than pine, evergreen, eucalyptus or fir trees.
  • Regularly clean your roof and gutters; remove any debris that could catch fire.
  • Inspect your chimneys at least twice a year, and clean them at least once a year. Keep the dampers in good working order. Equip chimneys and stovepipes with a spark arrester.
  • Install mesh screen beneath porches, decks, floor areas and the home itself to prevent debris and combustible materials from accumulating. You should also cover openings to floors, roofs and attics with mesh screens to prevent sparks and embers from entering your home.
  • Install a dual-sensor smoke alarm on each level of your home, especially near bedrooms; test it every month and change the batteries at least once each year.
  • Teach your family members how to use a fire extinguisher (ABC type), and show them where it’s kept.
  • Keep household items available that can be used as fire tools, such as a rake, axe, handsaw or chain saw, bucket and shovel.
  • Keep a ladder that will reach the roof in case a family member ends up on the roof of a burning house.
  • Move flammable items away from the house and outside of your defensible space, including woodpiles, lawn furniture, barbecue grills, tarp coverings, etc.

Plan Your Water Needs

  • Have a garden hose that is long enough to reach any area of the home and other structures on the property.
  • Install freeze-proof exterior water outlets on at least two sides of the home and near other structures on the property.
  • Identify and maintain an adequate outside water source, such as a small pond, cistern, well, swimming pool or hydrant.
  • Consider obtaining a portable gasoline-powered pump in case electrical power is cut off.

It is recommended that you create a 10- to 30-metre safety zone around your home. Within this area, you can take steps to reduce potential exposure to flames and radiant heat. Homes built near wooded areas should have a minimum safety zone of 30 metres. If your home sits on a steep slope, standard protective measures may not be enough. Contact your local fire department or forestry office for additional information.

  • Rake leaves, dead limbs and twigs. Clear all flammable vegetation. Remove leaves and rubbish from under structures.
  • Thin a 5-metre space between tree crowns, and remove limbs within 5 metres of the ground.
  • Remove dead branches that extend over the roof.
  • Prune tree branches and shrubs within 5 metres of a stovepipe or chimney outlet.
  • Ask the power company to clear branches from power lines.
  • Mow grass regularly.
  • Clear a 3-metre area around propane tanks and the barbecue. Place a screen over the grill, made of a non-flammable material with mesh.
  • Regularly dispose of newspapers and rubbish at an approved site. Follow local burning regulations.
  • Place stove, fireplace and grill ashes in a metal bucket and soak them in water for two days, then bury the cold ashes in mineral soil.
  • Store gasoline, oily rags and other flammable materials in approved safety cans. Place the cans in a safe location away from the base of buildings.
  • Stack firewood at least 30 metres away and uphill from your home. Clear combustible material within 6 metres of a woodpile.
  • Review your homeowner’s insurance policy and prepare or update a list of your home’s contents.

Follow Local Burning Laws

  • Before burning debris in a wooded area, make sure you notify local authorities and obtain a burning permit.
  • Use an approved incinerator with a safety lid.
  • Create at least a 3-metre clearing around the incinerator before burning debris.
  • Have a fire extinguisher or garden hose on hand when burning debris.

During a Wildfire

If you are advised to evacuate, do so immediately. Take your disaster supply kit, lock your home and choose a route away from the wildfire. Watch for changes in the speed and direction of the fire and smoke. Tell someone when you left and where you are going.

If you see a wildfire and haven’t received evacuation orders yet, call 911. Don’t assume that someone else has already called. Describe the location of the fire, speak slowly and clearly and answer any questions the dispatcher asks.

If you are not ordered to evacuate, and have time to prepare your home, take the following actions:

  • Arrange temporary housing at a friend or relative’s home outside the threatened area in case you need to evacuate.
  • Wear protective clothing when outside, such as sturdy shoes, cotton or wool clothes, long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, gloves and a handkerchief to protect your face.
  • Gather fire tools such as a rake, axe, handsaw or chainsaw, bucket and shovel.
  • Close outside attic, eaves and basement vents, windows, doors and other openings. Remove flammable drapes and curtains. Close all shutters, blinds or heavy non-combustible window coverings to reduce radiant heat.
  • Close all doors inside the house to prevent drafts. Open the damper on your fireplace, but close the fireplace screen.
  • Shut off any natural gas, propane or fuel oil supplies at the source.
  • Connect garden hoses to outdoor water taps and fill any pools, hot tubs, garbage cans, tubs or other large containers with water.
  • Place lawn sprinklers on the roof and near aboveground fuel tanks. Leave sprinklers on and dowse these structures as long as possible.
  • If you have gas-powered pumps for water, make sure they are fuelled and ready.
  • Place a ladder in clear view against the house.
  • Disconnect any automatic garage door openers so that doors can still be opened by hand if the power goes out. Close all garage doors.
  • Place valuable papers, mementos and anything “you can’t live without” inside the car in the garage, ready for quick departure. Any pets still with you should also be put in the car.
  • Place valuables that will not be damaged by water in a pool or pond.
  • Move flammable furniture into the centre of the home away from the windows and sliding glass doors.
  • Turn on outside lights and leave a light on in every room to make the house more visible in heavy smoke.

After a Wildfire

The following are guidelines for what to do in the period following a wildfire.

  • If you are with burn victims, or are a burn victim yourself, call 911 or seek help immediately. Cool and cover burns to reduce the chance of further injury or infection.
  • If you remained at home, check the roof immediately after the fire danger has passed. Put out any roof fires, sparks or embers. Check the attic for hidden burning sparks.
  • For several hours after the wildfire, maintain a “fire watch.” Re-check for smoke and sparks throughout the house.
  • If you have evacuated, do not enter your home until fire officials say it is safe.
  • If you must leave your home because a building inspector says the building is unsafe, ask someone you trust to watch the property during your absence.
  • Use caution when entering burned areas as hazards may still exist, including hot spots, which can flare up without warning.
  • If you detect heat or smoke when entering a damaged building, evacuate immediately.
  • If you have a safe or strongbox, do not try to open it. It can hold intense heat for several hours. If the door is opened before the box has cooled, the contents could burst into flames.
  • Avoid damaged or fallen power lines, poles and downed wires.
  • Watch for ash pits and mark them for safety. Warn family and neighbours to keep clear of the pits.
  • Watch your pets closely and keep them under your direct control. Hidden embers and hot spots could burn them.
  • Follow public health guidance on safe cleanup of fire ash and safe use of masks.
  • Dampen debris to minimize inhaling dust particles.
  • Wear leather gloves and heavy-soled shoes to protect your hands and feet.
  • Properly dispose of cleaning products, paint, batteries and damaged fuel containers to avoid risk.
  • Discard any food that has been exposed to heat, smoke or soot.
  • Do NOT use water that you think may be contaminated to wash dishes, brush your teeth, prepare food, wash your hands, make ice or make baby formula.
  • You may find yourself in the position of taking charge of other people. Listen carefully to what people are telling you, and deal patiently with urgent situations first.

In addition to insuring your home, we are committed to helping you and your loved ones stay safe when disaster strikes. If you would like more information on developing a family emergency plan or building a disaster supply kit, please contact Munn Insurance today.